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20120901
20120930
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
the other first-time campers, dr. michael thompson has reassuring news. he wrote the book "homesick and happy." as the title says, you can miss your family and still be having a good time. >> i think there are many kids who love camp but have, in the evening, at bedtime, or when they wake up in the morning, some really painful feelings of homesickness, and then they're great the rest of the day. >> for my first year i was homesick. >> the first day i went there, i was really sad 'cause it was, like, the first time i've ever been to a sleepaway camp. >> i cried for about a day or two. >> i sort of felt scared being away from home and being away from the safeness of my parents. >> so, what do you do about it? dr. thompson says share your feelings. >> it helps to talk to your friends. it especially helps to talk to your counselor. one of the things you learn at camp is that almost everybody is homesick from time to time. >> since it was a girl scout camp i, like, ate cookies to make myself feel better, but there was, like, my friends there, too, from my troop, and they helped me. >> it
so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the screen. you will be watching up on the big screen as we play a game of tennis. are you ready? all right. we will select two players. that is me. does that look like me? it kind of t
. bond, andy, dr. robert thompson, bond wanted a doctor down there in case to do further studies and keep an eye on things, and the diver sanders tiger manning. so on this date they swim into the lab from a pressurized elevator essentially that takes them down to the debt and -- barth and they have to get to the lab and i will explain how that works. but this is kind of the audio from some tapes i can across in my research, and i should say one thing i found out early on with sealab is there was no catalog archive. this was in people's basements and drawers and something like a case of an unmarked if anyone remembers the real-to-real format because your digital now, so they are getting a pretty good riser the theory wonderful window into what these guys were doing. and the point i was going to make is some of this kind of archival material so familiar to us from the conversations between houston and the astronauts and the mercury projects of course right up to the moon landing and neil armstrong and one small step for man and a giant step for mankind. this is kind of that moment when it c
general. dr. paul volcker dain, thompson's koski and others. they didn't know at that point whether they were taking home the infection and their children, families, but they stood their ground and began to treat the sick and the ailing as if they were children that we were part of the same cisco family. and that in essence is a san francisco values values is all about. we take care of our own. when the rest of the country with rejecting h. patients putting on airplanes to be flown to san francisco in their dying days, san francisco to them in and took care of them. so we take care of our own. that is the value here. one of the key people who did that, going back to the 1960s and i'm very glad if you're with us today, dr. david smith who was the brave young doctor back in the 1960s when they were not treating the young who were on the streets, the runaways swarming into san francisco in the summer of love of 1967, st. mary's hospital and the hate to not treat young people who are having trouble overdoses, that the haight-ashbury clinic under dr. smith and his praise staff spent over
of nbc's ann thompson. >> reporter: on this scrap of papyrus, the forerunner, to paper, the explosive words. >> jesus said to them, my wife. >> reporter: the discovery made by the dr. karen king. >> here you can see what looks to be in english like a "i" and a "c" with just a little bit of a line over them. this is a shortened form of the name jesus. jesus. >> reporter: king is a historian specializing in early christianity. the owner, a private anonymous collector that brought it to king last year for translation. >> when i first saw this fragment, it was actually through a photograph. and i couldn't believe it. once we finally came to the decision that it said, jesus said to them, my wife, it was really an astonishing moment. >> reporter: king turned to new york university's roger mcnall to authenticate. >> she knew it was potentially a blockbuster and that was why the stakes were high in figuring out when it might come from, where it might come from, was it real? >> reporter: the fragment, one and a half inches by three written in the coptic language with eight broken lines and con
travel assistance to david thompson. we went on probation for your and we did not fit to recruit. -- we went on probation for a year and we did not get to recruit. we have dr. john lombardi, a professor of history at louisiana state university. he previously served in a number of academic roles, president of the lsu system, president of the university of florida, and provost of johns hopkins university. he is the author of dozens of books and articles. he served on many committees to advance the reform of collegiate structures in athletics and the n.c.a.a.. we also have taylor branch. he is the pulitzer prize-winning journalist. he has a three-volume chronicle of the life of martin luther king jr. called "america in the king years." he is also more recently -- if we can get that up there on the screen -- is called "the cartel," which dispels corruption within the n.c.a.a. and what might be done to remedy it. we will just go briefly over the basic ground rules for tonight. they should not be that complex. i should tell you, i am not really a speaker tonight. i am just an official. [laugh
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)